26 Jul 2018 8:00am to 6:00pm

Translational Research Symposium 2018

The 6th Annual Translational Research Symposium will be held on Thursday 26 July at the Translational Research Institute, Brisbane. This year the theme is “Careers Beyond Academia” with the aim to promote careers outside of academia, and provide insight into the alternative paths available. The discussion panel and keynote speakers will explain their journey into alternative careers in sales, industry, consultancy, entrepreneurship, business, clinical and policy areas.

The 2018 categories to enter are Discovery, Development and Implementation.  These terms broadly describe the translational research pathway. 

This event promotes networking throughout South-East Queensland amongst post-graduate students and professionals willing to showcase their translational research. Oral and poster sessions will be held throughout the day.  All researchers and students are welcome to attend.

For more information please follow us on twitter @TRS_2018 and or contact the committee via email at [email protected]

Symposium Program

Activity Time
Registration (Outside Auditorium) 8:00am - 8:45am
Welcome Note and Housekeeping 8:45am - 9:00am
Panel Discussion - "Careers Beyond Academia" 9:00am - 10:00am
Poster Session 1 (morning tea included) 10:00am - 11:00am
Oral Session 1 11:00am - 12:15pm
Lunch 12:15pm - 12:45pm
Poster Session 2 12:45pm - 1:45pm
Oral Session 2 1:45pm - 3:00pm
Afternoon tea 3:00pm - 3:15pm
Poster Session 3 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Keynote Speakers - "Careers Beyond Academia" and Awards Ceremony 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Networking Drinks and Nibbles 5:00pm - 6:00pm
 

Note: Catering is provided.

DISCOVER

Investigate the what, why and how behind biological processes through fundamental research and proof of concept work

DEVELOPMENT

Creating and designing treatments, technology, delivery and detection systems that would enable the fundamental research to be translated into a pre-clinical setting

IMPLEMENTATION

The optimisation and commercialisation of diagnostic treatments or preventative approaches in the clinical setting

Discussion Panel: Careers Beyond Academia - Where can a PhD (postgraduate studies) lead you?

Have you been thinking about what your next step is after post-graduate studies? You might be close to finishing Honours, Masters or your PhD? Perhaps you’re an early career researcher and you would like to move on from research? The 2018 Translational Research Symposium theme is “Beyond academia” featuring a discussion panel, and keynote speakers. Our invited panellists and keynote speakers are from a variety of backgrounds and will be discussing their journeys from academia into sales, industry, consultancy, start-ups, business, and policy positions. 

Discussion Panel

9am-10am

TRI Auditorium

Professor Vicki Clifton

Professor Vicki Clifton is a National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Research Fellow who is currently the Program leader of Mothers and Babies Theme at Mater Medical Research Institute in Brisbane Australia. Vicki was employed at the Robinson Research Institute, School of Paediatrics and Reproductive Health at the University of Adelaide from January 2008 to April 2015 after many years at the Mothers and Babies Research Centre in Newcastle, Australia. While at the Robinson Research Institute she was Director of Clinical Research at the Lyell McEwin Hospital in Adelaide, Australia (2009-2014) and leader of the Allergy Research Priority. Prof Clifton spent many years as Treasurer and then President of the Endocrine Society of Australia (2004-2013). She is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and obtained a Diploma of Management from the University of Adelaide. Prof Clifton is internationally recognized for her research into the human placenta and is currently Editor of the Placenta Journal (2012-present). She is also an Executive member of the International Society of Endocrinology Board that oversees and supports the activities of the national societies of endocrinology in 80 countries around the world. Her current research focusses on the impact of maternal asthma and other health complications during pregnancy on placental function, fetal growth and childhood development. She has a specific interest in the sex specific differences in the fetal-placental response to a complication of pregnancy and understanding the different strategies male and female fetuses institute to cope with an adverse event in pregnancy and how this ensures their survival in early life.

Dianne Jackson-Matthews, BSc (Hons), PhD, RAC

Chief Scientific Officer at the ERA Consulting Group and Director of Regulatory Affairs (Australia)

Dianne is the Chief Scientific Officer for the ERA Consulting Group.  She has over 25 years of experience in pharmaceutical product development, spanning the areas of drugs, biologics, and cell/gene therapies in the US, Europe and Australia, with particular expertise in biotech/biosimilar products.  Dianne has extensive development experience in the US biopharmaceutical industry, covering manufacture and bioanalytics for biotech products, small and large scale mammalian cell culture, fermentation process optimization/technology transfer, monoclonal antibody production, immunoassay and bioanalytical methods development and validation to ICH standards, and compliance to GMP and GLP requirements.  She also has extensive expertise in developing regulatory and technical strategies, conducting regulatory agency interactions worldwide, authoring regulatory documentation and expert reports, and performing regulatory and technical due diligence assessments supporting funding and licensing opportunities for the investment community and the industry.  Dianne currently heads the ERA Consulting (Australia) Pty Ltd operation in Brisbane, Australia.  Prior to joining ERA in 2001 as the Director of the ERA Washington DC office, she was the Director of Regulatory Affairs at a biotechnology company in New Jersey for 12 years.  Dianne also has 6 years’ experience with in vitro diagnostic device development in the US. She completed four years postdoctoral research including fellowships at the University of Pennsylvania and Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, USA.  She has held an Adjunct Associate Professor position at the University of Queensland, Australia, since 2010.

Claire Williams

Clinical Trial Unit Manager, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus)

Dr Claire Williams is the Clinical Trial Unit Manager at Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus), which conducts both investigator-initiated and commercial clinical research. Claire completed her PhD in Neuropharmacology at Imperial College London, where her work involved pre-clinical and lab-based research on new therapies for Parkinson’s disease. She has since gained significant experience in clinical trial management and coordination of both commercially-sponsored and investigator-initiated clinical trials across multiple phases and therapeutic areas in both the UK and Australia.  

Dr Sora Fallaha

Dr Sora Fallaha developed an interest in science and cancer research from a young age. After undertaking her Bachelor’s in Bio-medical laboratory sciences from the University of Jordan she went on to pursue postgraduate studies in Australia. She completed her Masters of Medical Research at Griffith University, where she investigated the effect of the delivery route of siRNA lipoplexes on shaping the innate immune response for which she was recognised with the Academic excellence award in 2012. Dr Fallaha was then awarded with a Griffith University International Postgraduate Research Scholarships to expand her research profile where she specialised in targeted molecular therapies for HPV-driven cervical cancers (2017). Her research was performed at Menzies Health Institute, Griffith University, and Translational Research Institute. 

Based on her molecular oncology knowledge, Dr Fallaha was recruited by the medical branch of TOMI group, Tomi Australia Pty. Ltd.  As a team leader she has been working with multiple national and international healthcare providers to establish a Proton Beam Therapy Centre in Australia, a new type of targeted radiation therapy using particle therapy. Throughout both her academic and professional career, Dr Fallaha’s work has been highly regarded by her peers and she has attracted awards and grants alike. She is currently a member of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine (AZSNM), the Arab Society of Nuclear Medicine (ARSNM), The Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG), the Australian Society for Medical Research and an adjunct fellow at Griffith University.

Dr Julio Ribeiro

Dr Julio Ribeiro completed a MSc degree in Genetics in 1985. This was in the early days of the PCR revolution and the impact that this technology platform had on biomedical research left a lasting impression on Dr Ribeiro.
After completing his PhD in Medicine in 1998 at UNSW, Dr Ribeiro worked with Sigma-Aldrich Pty Ltd, eventually holding several senior executive roles including managing the development, production and sale of new products across the Asia-Pacific region. His experience in the development and sale of innovative scientific products, combined with an entrepreneurial spirit, led Dr Ribeiro to establish Inventia Pty Ltd in 2006. In its early years, Inventia secured manufacturing contracts for the production of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) reagents for Australia and various export markets.

In 2012, Dr Ribeiro successfully established the most advanced bovine IVF business in Australia through Inventia Genetic Technologies (IGT). Within three years, IGT was recognised as one of the top three most efficient and productive bovine IVF laboratories in the world by a global leader in the supply of bovine IVF technology. In 2012, Dr Ribeiro also started the Rastrum Project in partnership with UNSW and the Children's Cancer Institute (Lowy Institute). This project was initiated with the conviction that 3D bioprinting as a platform technology would have an impact on biomedical research comparable to that caused by the advent of PCR. Dr Ribeiro’s vision was to develop a 3D bioprinting platform designed specifically for in vitro cell-based research, creating a technological and commercial foundation from which to advance clinical applications of 3D bioprinting.

The Rastrum Project has been successful in obtaining two ARC Linkage grants and several other major Federal Government grants. Inventia Life Science (ILS), created to commercialise the 3D bioprinting platform, has received venture-capital funding from one of Australia’s leading funds (Blackbird Ventures) and is expanding rapidly.

Michael Bian PhD

Michael undertook his PhD at Mater Medical Research from 2011 to 2014, and studied characteristics and functions of memory CD4+ T cells in paediatric patients with type 1 diabetes, in comparison with those in non-diabetic siblings as well as age- and gender-matched unrelated healthy control children. This work was advised by Dr Slavica Vuckovic, Dr Mark Harris, Prof Andrew Cotterill and Prof Mike McGuckin, and published in Diabetes journal in 2015. During his PhD, Michael was also involved in organizing two postgraduate student conferences for Australian Society for Medical Research. After graduation, Michael joined the pharmaceutical industry and started as a medical representative at AstraZeneca. From this first customer-facing job, he acquired important skills such as effective communication, rapport building, strategic planning and educational event organization, which are essential for the success of landing his second pharma job as a medical scientific liaison (MSL). MSL is a critical role in pharma companies. It drives the building of scientific advocacy with key clinical opinion leaders through clinical data exchange and collaborative research, and bring business-critical insights back to the company. Internally, MSLs are scientific experts, who provide education and training as well as cross-functional support to marketing and sales teams. Michael will be able to share his MSL experiences from the past 2.5 years from Sanofi and Novartis.

Dr Cameron Snell

Dr Cameron Snell BMedSc MBBS (Melb.) DPhil (Oxon.) FRCPA is a tumour pathologist with Mater Pathology, who trained in Melbourne, Brisbane and Oxford, UK. He completed his fellowship in 2014 having been awarded the Eddie Hirst memorial prize for pathological sciences.

Dr Snell has a particular interest in individualised cancer diagnosis and care. He was awarded the Oxford Nuffield Fellowship in 2010 which allowed him to develop novel diagnostic assays and complete his DPhil in tumour hypoxia.  He is now involved in teaching and research with Mater Research and as an honorary senior lecturer at the University of Queensland. He leads the Cancer Pathology Research Group, which collaborates widely with cancer research groups in breast, melanoma, lung and gynaecological cancers.

Cameron’s research interests are in developing novel clinical tests that can predict responses to targeted therapies in cancer. He has expertise in target cell detection, observation of drug and cell interactions and cohort based treatment trials. He is currently involved in building large clinical cohorts for retrospective cohort studies in melanoma, breast and gynaecological cancers. 
Cameron’s research aims to match the most effective cancer therapies to patients. This has the potential to increase the number of patients achieving a cure in early stage cancers, and increasing survival in those with later stage cancers.
Cameron is a Fellow with the The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, the American Society of Clinical Oncologists (ASCO) the Australasian Lung Cancer Trials Group and a member of the Mater Research Committee.

 

 

Keynote Speakers: Careers Beyond Academia - Where can a PhD (postgraduate studies) lead you?

Keynote Speakers

4:15pm - 5pm

TRI Auditorium

Dr David Loch, PhD

Associate Patent and Trade Mark Attorney, Spruson & Ferguson

David’s broad background in scientific research, particularly molecular biology and cancer cell biology, has been extremely advantageous in his present role, where he is involved in drafting and prosecuting patent and trade mark applications, searching, freedom to operate opinions, oppositions and other Intellectual Property related matters for both international and local clients. His first-hand experience innovating within a laboratory setting has put David in a strong position to identify strengths, weaknesses and opportunities in a client’s patent portfolio, thereby offering greater opportunity to comprehensively protect and enforce their Intellectual Property rights. Before becoming a patent attorney, David completed a PhD in cardiovascular pharmacology. He then sought to augment his training with a greater focus on molecular genetics through a 5 year post-doctoral fellowship at America’s prestigious Johns Hopkins University, within its Institute of Genetic Medicine. Here he worked under a world leader in Marfan syndrome and associated connective tissue disorders, developing genetically-engineered mouse models to test new treatment strategies for Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Upon returning to Australia, David became a Research Fellow at the Queensland University of Technology, where he investigated the genetic causes of drug resistance to molecularly targeted agents in endometrial cancer. He is published in more than a dozen international, peer-reviewed scientific journals. David is a graduate of the University of Queensland (Bachelor of Veterinary Science, Doctor of Philosophy) and the University of Technology Sydney (Master of Intellectual Property).

Dr Nikki Sims-Chilton

Dr Nikki Sims-Chilton is currently a Principal Project Officer in the Office of the Queensland Chief Scientist (Queensland Government), where she manages the Queensland Chief Scientist’s Engaging Queenslanders in Science strategy. The aim of the strategy is to create a Queensland population, which engages in, recognises, supports and advocates for science. Nikki actively promotes Queensland science and provides support for EMCRs in science communication and engagement. She is also currently writing a strategy for citizen science in Queensland.

Nikki completed her PhD in 2009, which focussed on evaluating the biological control program of an Australian weed using experiments and mathematical models. Following completion of her PhD, Nikki has worked for the Queensland Government in various roles including as an advisor to a former Minister for science. Nikki also sits on the QUT Science and Engineering Faculty Academic Board and Queensland National Science Week committee. Outside of work, Nikki is a Mum to two children (Miss A – 6 and Mr H – 4), lover of books, and host and founder of the podcast In Mum’s good books.

 

List of Oral and Poster Presenters

Oral Presentations

Oral presentations will be 8 minutes, followed by 2 minutes question time per speaker. The winner and runner-up announced after the keynote speaker at the end of the day.

OS1 - Oral Session 1, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

OS2 - Oral Session 2, 1:45 pm - 3:00 pm  

Translational Research Institute Auditorium

ORALIST NUMBER

PRESENTER

TITLE

SESSION

1

Kylie Alexander

 Oncostatin M is a key effector of heterotopic ossification following spinal cord injuries

OS1

2

Jeremy F Brooks

 Characterising autoantibody responses by polyclonal self-reactive B cells

OS1

3

Samantha Cosh

 Low-grade serous ovarian carcinoma: use of patient derived xenograft models and evaluation of targeted therapies

OS1

4

Julie Davies

 E-selectin Activates Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages

OS1

5

Farhad Dehkhoda

 Mechanism of GP130 activation and regulation of its downstream signalling

OS1

6

Johnson Da Huang

 EGFR is over-expressed in 90% of cSCC with perineural spread: metastatic potential and therapeutic possibility

OS1

7

Zhengxiang Huang

 SGLT2 inhibitor prevents hyperinsulinemia and restores pulsatile growth hormone secretion in obese pre-diabetic mice

OS2

8

Zhixiu Li

 Genetic risk score prediction in ankylosing spondylitis

OS2

9

Lisa K Philp

 Targeting Leptin Receptor Signalling Slows the Progression of Advanced Prostate Cancer

OS2

10

Susannah Tye

 An Insulin-Sensitive Antidepressant Mechanism for Ketamine in Treatment Resistant Depression

OS2

11

Mark Williams

 Helping our clinical geneticists – improving guidelines for specific neurodevelopmental disorders

OS2

12

Shenxi Yu

 Phenotypic screening of Lactobacillus spp. against respiratory pathogens

OS2

Translational Relevance Prize Shortlist

The following shortlisted presenters will be considered for the Translational Relevance Prize.   The shortlist was generated after judging of the stand-alone 60 word pitch within the abstract submission.  The winner will be announced at the awards session. Congratulations to the shortlisted presenters!

PRESENTER 

 TITLE

Carl Haupt

Nanoscale Bead-Based Tetramer Enrichment Results in Rapid Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cell Expansion

Christine Zhang

Aberrant splicing in CN-AML – can aberrant splicing aid in MRD monitoring of CN-AML?

Maryam Dabbaghi

Comparison of static Franz cell and flow through IVPT systems for topical product performance testing

Thomas Mullins

Validation Of Non-invasive Transcutaneous Method For Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) In Obese Mice

Jack Galbraith

A genome-wide approach to murine wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis: inter-strain differences using “The Collaborative Cross”

Jonathan Wei

Space- and time-resolved investigation on diffusion kinetics and metabolic lifetime of human skin following macromolecule delive

Elliot Teo

Human mesenchymal and endothelial progenitor cells from the placenta to the hypoxic ischemic brain

Maria Schwarz

Speech Pathology led administration of CoPhenylcaine Forte Nasal Spray: extending scope of practice

Danielle Harrop

A Novel Patient-Centred Model of Care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with Acute Coronary Syndrome Improves Outcomes

Tayla Robertson

Early oral feeding after colorectal surgery: a mixed methods study of knowledge translation

Poster Presentations

Each poster session is held over two rooms (2003/2004 and 2007).  Prizes will be announced after the keynote speakers at the end of the day.  Updated July 18th - Please see your revised poster number and location.

Set up and Pack down of posters is to be strictly done during the following times

Poster Session 1 (Room 2003/2004 and Room 2007): 

     Set up - Prior to 10:00 am

     Take down - 11:00 am - 11:15 am

Poster Session 2 (Room 2003/2004 and Room 2007): 

     Set up - 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

     Take down - 1:45 pm - 2:00 pm

Poster Session 3 (Room 2003/2004 and Room 2007): 

     Set up - 1:45 pm - 3:00 pm

     Take down - 4:15 pm - 4:30 pm

POSTER

NUMBER 

PRESENTER

TITLE

SESSION

1

Yu-Chen Enya Chen

Activation of FcγR-dependent responses to therapeutic antibodies by Nurse Like cells requires PI3Kδ

PS1; Room 2003/2004

2

Tashbib Khan

Targeting the Achilles' Heel of Clear Cell Ovarian Cancer

PS1; Room 2003/2004

3

Johanna Erbani

Vascular niche E-selectin plays a key role in leukemia chemoresistance via receptors CD44 and CD162

PS1; Room 2003/2004

4

Carl Haupt

Nanoscale Bead-Based Tetramer Enrichment Results in Rapid Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cell Expansion

PS1; Room 2003/2004

5

Sikta Samantray

Characterisation Of Naloxone Use In Patients Presenting To A Clinical Toxicology Unit

PS1; Room 2003/2004

6

Mei-Chun Yeh

Targeted beta therapy of human prostate cancer in vivo with Lu-177 labelled MIL-38 antibody against glypican-1 (GPC-1)

PS1; Room 2003/2004

7

Danielle S. Cha

Perceived Sleep Quality Predicts Cognitive Function in Adults with Major Depressive Disorder Independent of Depression Severity

PS1; Room 2003/2004

8

Danielle S. Cha

Cognitive Impairment as Measured by the THINC-integrated tool (THINC-it): The association with Self-Reported Anxiety in MDD

PS1; Room 2003/2004

9

Upekha Liyanage

Is there a causal relationship between vitamin D and melanoma risk? : A Mendelian randomisation study

PS1; Room 2003/2004

10

Md. Moniruzzaman

Interleukin-22: a potential therapy to control intestinal inflammation

PS1; Room 2003/2004

11

Carrie Coggon

Presence of inhibitory antibodies in patients with Escherichia coli urosepsis.

PS1; Room 2003/2004

12

Justina Nadia Lee Li Wen

NLRC5: A Novel Genetic Mechanism That Underpins Immune Evasion in Follicular Lymphoma

PS1; Room 2003/2004

13

Asmerom Sengal

The role FGFR2 overexpression in endometrial cancer progression

PS1; Room 2003/2004

14

Seyed Ebrahim Alavi

Development And Optimization Of GLP-1 Analogs For The Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

PS1; Room 2003/2004

15

Farhana Matin

A Plasma Biomarker Panel of Four MicroRNAs for the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

PS1; Room 2003/2004

16

Bianca Nowlan

Sublethal Irradiation Of Mice Improves Long-term Engraftment Of Human Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells

PS1; Room 2003/2004

17

James Dight

Endovascular progenitors initiate and drive de novo vascularisation in melanoma

PS1; Room 2003/2004

18

Yoke Seng Lee

Whole blood human dendritic cell immunoprofiling in advanced melanoma patients

PS1; Room 2003/2004

19

Kaylyn Tousignant

Enhanced lipid uptake and lipid remodelling are adaptive responses to androgen-targeted therapies in prostate cancer

PS1; Room 2003/2004

20

Ella Trembizki

Laboratory responses to cases of ceftriaxone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae

PS1; Room 2003/2004

21

Raji Baidya

A Novel Steatotic Liver In Vitro Model To Study Ischaemia-reperfusion Injury

PS1; Room 2007

22

Joshua Tay

PGI2 Is A Novel Bone Marrow Niche Factor And Protects Haematopoietic Stem Cell From Stress

PS1; Room 2007

23

Christine Zhang

Aberrant splicing in CN-AML – can aberrant splicing aid in MRD monitoring of CN-AML?

PS1; Room 2007

24

Jayne-Louise Pritchard

Functional Investigation Of Ovarian And Endometrial Cancer Genetic Risk Regions: Drug Repositioning Opportunities.

PS1; Room 2007

25

Joachim Torrano

SETDB2-mediated drug tolerance in melanoma

PS1; Room 2007

26

Ghazal Daraj

Dendritic cells have distinct cytosolic DNA sensors that can detect different types of DNA

PS1; Room 2007

27

Paula Kuo

Effective Migration Of Skin Dendritic Cells To The Draining Lymph Node Is Dependent On HPV16E7-RB Interaction

PS1; Room 2007

28

Sadia Afrin

Quantitative analysis of MLL-fusion transcripts by ddPCR to monitor minimal residual disease in MLL-rearranged leukemia

PS1; Room 2007

29

Jodie Connolly

Constraint Induced Language Therapy (CILT) in early inpatient rehabilitation - use of a student model

PS1; Room 2007

30

Jose J. Morosoli

Overcoming deterministic understandings of genetic findings in mental health: proposing an framework to enhance translation

PS1; Room 2007

31

Dr Kelly-Anne Masterman

Targeting human CD141+ DC for cancer immunotherapy

PS1; Room 2007

32

Lisa Jurak

Interleukin 33 selectively augments rhinovirus-induced type 2 immune responses in asthmatic but not healthy people.

PS1; Room 2007

33

Patricia Gerdes

Whole genome sequencing identifies de novo L1 insertions in mouse induced pluripotent stem cells

PS1; Room 2007

34

Maleea Holbert

Hydrogel dressing versus plastic wrap for acute paediatric burn injuries: A randomised controlled trial protocol

PS1; Room 2007

35

Maryam Dabbaghi

Comparison of static Franz cell and flow through IVPT systems for topical product performance testing

PS1; Room 2007

36

Thomas Mullins

Validation Of Non-invasive Transcutaneous Method For Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) In Obese Mice

PS1; Room 2007

37

Hui Yi Chew

Investigating the effect of combination therapy on cetuximab inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor signalling in HNSCC

PS1; Room 2007

38

Venkatesh Gavini

Design, synthesis and evaluation of targeted, bioresponsive ‘catch-and-release’ gene delivery systems

PS1; Room 2007

39

Liam O'Brien

Development and Characterization of a Humanized Mouse Model of Melanoma

PS1; Room 2007

40

Stanimira Kartolova

Quality of care for low risk women in pregnancy - how a model of GP shared care measures up

PS1; Room 2007

41

Deborah Hazel Nazareth

Less is more: Low dose Hydroxyurea selectively synergizes with CHEK1 inhibitor to kill NSCLC

PS2; Room 2003/2004

42

Gerald Holtmann

Categorisation Of Patients With Dyspeptic Symptoms Using The Structured Assessment Of Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scale (SAGIS)

PS2; Room 2003/2004

43

Haotian Yang

Cisplatin Induces Time-Dependent Changes of ROS Level and DNA Damage in Colon Cancer Cells

PS2; Room 2003/2004

44

Emily Wilson

Adoptive transfer of genetically engineered monocytes for the tumour targeted delivery of IFN-alpha in breast cancer

PS2; Room 2003/2004

45

Mischa Lundberg

Detecting  transposable element insertions from whole genome and targeted sequencing data

PS2; Room 2003/2004

46

Gerald Holtmann

Link between symptom severity, gender and self-reported psychiatric disorders in 12,806 consecutive gastroenterology patients

PS2; Room 2003/2004

47

Miles Seidel

Automated MRI measures of brain morphology and microstructure in preterm infants and association with neurodevelopmental outcome

PS2; Room 2003/2004

48

Christine Lee Mei Mei

Development of peptides targeting constitutive active oncogenic thrombopoietin receptor (TPOR) mutants

PS2; Room 2003/2004

49

Anh Do

Association of small gut mucosal T-cells, microbiota and symptoms in FGID patients

PS2; Room 2003/2004

50

Sharene Chong

Effect of a previous diagnosis of primary invasive melanoma on the progression of subsequent primary invasive melanoma

PS2; Room 2003/2004

51

Stuti Kapadia

Evaluation of interfollicular epidermis ablation as a method to induce epidermal repair and reduce UV-carcinogenesis.

PS2; Room 2003/2004

52

Marguerite Kutyla

Improving the Quality of Bowel Preparation: Rewarding patients for success or intensive patient education?

PS2; Room 2003/2004

53

Dr Marcus Gray

In Crohn’s Disease, anti-TNFa reduces the impact of interoception on limbic function.

PS2; Room 2003/2004

54

Chenhao Zhou

Understanding CD4+ T cell response to HPV16 E7 antigen in a mouse model of precancerous skin

PS2; Room 2003/2004

55

Sarah-Louise Ryan

Development and Implementation of a Novel 3D Culture Technology at TRI

PS2; Room 2003/2004

56

Annika Krueger

Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus secretome and its impact on epithelial inflammation

PS2; Room 2003/2004

57

Ashley Meakin

Sex-specific placental androgen receptor isoform expression varies with maternal asthma and growth

PS2; Room 2003/2004

58

Jessica McMaster

Characterisation of the mucosal- and device-associated microbiota following treatment with a duodenal-jejunal bypass sleeve

PS2; Room 2003/2004

59

Jessica McMaster

The duodenal-jejunal bypass sleeve (EndoBarrier®) induces transient changes in the stool microbiota

PS2; Room 2003/2004

60

Lydia C Ryan

Heart and renal outcomes with anti-diabetic agent, sotagliflozin, in mouse model of cardiac pressure overload

PS2; Room 2003/2004

61

Gayathri Thillaiyampalam

An integrated systems analysis of miRNA target network associated with natural killer cell activation

PS2; Room 2007

62

Gerald Holtmann

Non-celiac-wheat-sensitivity and immune activation associated with specific alterations in duodenal microbiome

PS2; Room 2007

63

Conor N. Robinson

Effects of non-invasive brain stimulation on local cortical dynamics.

PS2; Room 2007

64

Jack Galbraith

A genome-wide approach to murine wound-induced hair follicle neogenesis: inter-strain differences using “The Collaborative Cross”

PS2; Room 2007

65

Jonathan Wei

Space- and time-resolved investigation on diffusion kinetics and metabolic lifetime of human skin following macromolecule delive

PS2; Room 2007

66

Thomas  Keech

Macrophage involvement in the response of acute myeloid leukaemia to chemotherapy

PS2; Room 2007

67

Nida Murtaza

Diets with different prebiotic content alter the gut prokaryote and fungal microbiota

PS2; Room 2007

68

Katherine Robbins

Inverse regulation of Notch4 and Wnt5a contribute to melanoma plasticity and drug resistance

PS2; Room 2007

69

James Volmer

Bile salt hydrolase genes in human Methanobrevibacter and Methanosphaera spp.

PS2; Room 2007

70

Sian Pottenger

A novel cluster of immunodulatory human gut bacteria related to Flavonifractor and Pseudoflavonifractor

PS2; Room 2007

71

Janaththani Panchadsaram

Functional analysis of GWAS identified 5p15 locus in prostate cancer

PS2; Room 2007

72

Chale Alemayehu

N-of-1 therapeutic equivalence trial of two formulations of Enalapril in the treatment of hypertension in Ethiopia-Pilot study

PS2; Room 2007

73

Amy Pham

The Prevalence of Inhibitory Antibodies in an Australian Cystic Fibrosis Cohort

PS2; Room 2007

74

Paraic O Cuiv

The gut microbiota shapes mucosal inflammatory tone and homeostasis in inflammatory bowel disease

PS2; Room 2007

75

Tessa Borloo

Cellular mechanisms correlated with treatment resistant depression and deep brain stimulation therapy.

PS2; Room 2007

76

Suja Pillai

Novel pathogenic mutations of EPAS1 and its genetic variations in phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas

PS2; Room 2007

77

Dr Aakansha Zala

Identifying immunogenic peptides in Graves’ disease

PS2; Room 2007

78

Anne-Sophie Bergot

Islet-specific Liposomes Induced Diabetes Protection is Dependent on Islet-specific Regulatory T cells Reprogramming

PS2; Room 2007

79

Liisa Murray

What makes a great type I interferon producer?

PS2; Room 2007

80

Adil Malik

The long and short of GWAS associated long non coding RNA

PS2; Room 2007

81

Shubhra Chandra

Elucidating the role of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1 Beta (HNF1B) transcript variants in prostate cancer

PS3; Room 2003/2004

82

Sara Hassan

Epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in circulating tumour cells from metastatic patients and PDX models

PS3; Room 2003/2004

83

Carolyn Brown

Feasability of using community pharmacies to increase participation in BreastScreen Queensland

PS3; Room 2003/2004

84

Madushan Fernando

AURKA overexpression overcomes the ATM dependent checkpoint in melanoma

PS3; Room 2003/2004

85

Elliot Teo

Human mesenchymal and endothelial progenitor cells from the placenta to the hypoxic ischemic brain

PS3; Room 2003/2004

86

Evelyn Nadar

Proteomic characterisation of Lactobacillus species as potential probiotics under stress from toxigenic Clostridium difficile O2

PS3; Room 2003/2004

87

Erwin M Berendsen

Introducing Microbial Culture-Metagenome Sequencing (MC-MGS) to characterize gut mucosa-associated microbial communities.

PS3; Room 2003/2004

88

Ayesha Shah

Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis: Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

PS3; Room 2003/2004

89

Jessica Lisle

EphA3 is critical for normal haematopoietic stem cell function

PS3; Room 2003/2004

90

Lena Batoon

CD169+ Osteal Macrophages Promote Osteoblast Maintenance And Bone Healing Independent Of Osteoclasts

PS3; Room 2003/2004

91

Adriana Pliego

The role of the tyrosine kinase receptor EphA3 in pre-leukemic T-ALL stem cells

PS3; Room 2003/2004

92

Dr Yash Chhabra

The molecular interaction of SRC family kinases with the growth hormone receptor and its role in signalling

PS3; Room 2003/2004

93

Angela Vivanti

Electronic health records enhance malnutrition screening tool (MST) completion in an acute adult mental health unit

PS3; Room 2003/2004

94

Jordan McCamley

Observations of the nutrition events undertaken by a dietetic department

PS3; Room 2003/2004

95

Zeng Guo

Measurement of Aldosterone by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Comparison with Radioimmunoassay and ...

PS3; Room 2003/2004

96

Maria Schwarz

Speech Pathology led administration of CoPhenylcaine Forte Nasal Spray: extending scope of practice

PS3; Room 2003/2004

97

Stephen Parker

Consumers expectations of mental health services: Using qualitative methods to guide the future of healthcare delivery

PS3; Room 2003/2004

98

Danielle Harrop

A Novel Patient-Centred Model of Care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders with Acute Coronary Syndrome Improves Outcomes

PS3; Room 2003/2004

99

Rehan Villani

Endothelin signalling in cancer associated fibroblasts supports a tumour promoting niche in Basal Cell Carcinoma

PS3; Room 2003/2004

100

Ayesha Shah

Quantitative PCR as a novel approach to determine influence of density of bacterial colonisation on health and disease

PS3; Room 2003/2004

101

Jessica Whyte

Investigating the functional mechanisms of Ankylosing Spondylitis

PS3; Room 2007

102

Tayla Robertson

Early oral feeding after colorectal surgery: a mixed methods study of knowledge translation

PS3; Room 2007

103

John Ham/Victoria Forre

Constipation incidence associated with opiate prescribing in a digital prescribing hospital: A retrospective study.

PS3; Room 2007

104

Jeong Hwan Jake Kim

An audit of GP referrals to a busy tertiary emergency department who are triaged to a waiting room: is there a gap in service?

PS3; Room 2007

105

Nicole Coffey

Knowledge Translation in a Heart Recovery Service: Creation of a stepped screening protocol for depression

PS3; Room 2007

106

Nina Wegener

Addressing client needs through interdisciplinary multi-site groups

PS3; Room 2007

107

Alexandra Lyons

Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

PS3; Room 2007

108

Aihua Wu

Acute sodium loading may inhibit NCC expression and activity in hypertensives with raised aldosterone/renin ratio

PS3; Room 2007

109

Farah Zahir

Exploring the gender-specific association between BMI and mortality in adults with and without diabetes: the AusDiab study

PS3; Room 2007

110

Ali Dulfikar

Feasibility of an Individualised Exercise Intervention During and After Treatment in Patients with Glioma:  A Case Report

PS3; Room 2007

111

Alena Murray

A scoping study examining vocational rehabilitation in early ABI Rehabilitation

PS3; Room 2007

112

Christopher George

Dosing of Unfractionated Heparin in obese patients at the Princess Alexandra Hospital

PS3; Room 2007

113

Samaneh Farashi

Functional follow up of a novel miRNA gene in prostate cancer identified from a Genome-wide association study

PS3; Room 2007

114

Anand Odedra

Safety and feasibility of using apheresis to harvest Plasmodium vivax parasites from experimentally infected subjects

PS3; Room 2007

115

Sugarniya Subramaniam

Genetic variants of PDK1 influences regulation by multiple microRNAs in prostate cancer

PS3; Room 2007

116

Kavita Bisht

Prolylhydroxylase inhibitor FG-4497 enhances haematopoietic stem cell mobilisation via vascular endothelial  growth factor receptor 2

PS3; Room 2007

117

Md Anayet Hasan

Low intensity non-genotoxic conditioning facilitates stable mixed hematopoietic chimerism of gene modified bone marrow

PS3; Room 2007

118

Raquel McGill

Elevated surface expression of C5aR1 on peripheral blood monocyte subpopulations from motor neuron disease patients

PS3; Room 2007

119

Mark Morrison

Mass spectrometric analysis of volatile organic compounds produced by duodenal microbiota

PS3; Room 2007

120

Suchismita Dutta

Mass spectrometric proteomic profile of acetylsalicylic acid treated and untreated trophoblast cells and exosomes at hypoxia

PS3; Room 2007

121

Soumyalekshmi Nair

Placental Exosomes in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Carry a Specific Set of miRNAs Associated with Insulin Sensitivity

PS3; Room 2007

If you have any questions regarding your oral, translational relevance shortlist, or poster presentation please email [email protected]  

Goodluck to the presenters for the 2018 Translational Research Symposium

Guidelines and Categories for Oral and Poster Presentations

CATEGORIES FOR ORAL AND POSTERS

Investigate the what, why and how behind biological processes through fundamental research and proof of concept work.

Create and design treatments, technology, delivery and detection systems that would enable the fundamental research to be translated into a pre-clinical setting.

the optimisation and commercialisation of diagnostic treatments or preventative approaches in the clinical setting.

Oral Presentation Guidelines

Oral presentations will be 8 minutes, with 2 minutes allowed for questions.  A bell will ring at 7 minutes and the chair will stand at 8 minutes and the talk will be immediately stopped for question time.  

Poster Presentation Guidelines

The poster must be A0 size (A0 size is 841mm x 1189mm) in portrait orientation.  It is recommended that font below size 24 is not to be used.  
 

Please see the above section List of Oral and Poster Presenters to see when you are presenting and the location of your poster presentation.  

Each poster session is held over two rooms (2003/2004 and 2007).  Prizes will be announced after the keynote speakers at the end of the day.  Updated July 18th - Please see your revised poster number and location.

Set up and Pack down of posters is to be strictly done during the following times

Poster Session 1 (Room 2003/2004 and Room 2007): 

     Set up - Prior to 10:00 am

     Take down - 11:00 am - 11:15 am

Poster Session 2 (Room 2003/2004 and Room 2007): 

     Set up - 11:15 am - 12:30 pm

     Take down - 1:45 pm - 2:00 pm

Poster Session 3 (Room 2003/2004 and Room 2007): 

     Set up - 1:45 pm - 3:00 pm

     Take down - 4:15 pm - 4:30 pm

Frequently Asked Questions

Where is the closest bus and train stop to TRI?
I am not submitting an abstract this year.  Can I still attend?
Who can submit an abstract?
Do I need to register as well if I submit an abstract?
What if I’m not sure which category to enter in?
Do I need to be with my poster during the poster session?
What is a translational aspect?

Where is the closest bus and train stop to TRI?

The closest bus station is the PA hospital stop, once you are off the bus, walk up the hill of Diamantina Rd to the large orange building, TRI.  The closest train station is Dutton Park train station, continue walking down Kent St and you can follow the orange path to the atrium of the TRI building.

I am not submitting an abstract this year.  Can I still attend?

Absolutely!  We hope to see you there.

Who can submit an abstract?

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS ARE NOW CLOSED

We open abstract submissions to all students (honours, masters and PhD), as well as anyone conducting translational research.  This includes research assistants, early career researchers (ECRs), mid-career researchers (MCRs).  We welcome anyone from the South-East Queensland region to submit abstracts and attend the symposium.

Do I need to register as well if I submit an abstract?

Yes.  Submitting an abstract is separate to registration.  Despite being a free event, we require registration to determine the numbers for catering, and food requirements.  Also by registering, you will be able to receive your free beverage from the coffee cart sponsored by the 2018 Platinum Sponsor, Mimotopes.  Registrations will open shortly after abstract submissions close and presenters announced, and a reminder email to register will be sent out to poster and oral presenters.  You must register to present at the TRS.

What if I’m not sure which category to enter in?

If you are unsure as to what category to enter under, please email [email protected] with the subject line ‘TRS-2018 Category’ with your abstract and we will let you know.  You will then need to return to the submissions page and enter your abstract. 

Do I need to be with my poster during the poster session?

To be eligible for poster prizes, you must be at your poster during the poster session.  Judges will make a maximum of two visits to your poster before awarding you ZERO.

What is a translational aspect?

A fundamental or basic science project is the systematic study towards a greater knowledge, or understanding.  A TRANSLATIONAL project is addressing a clinical question with information that may help improve a treatment, or care of patients.

Sponsors

Thank you to our 2018 sponsors.

At the symposium, the trade display passport allows attendees to win a prize – make sure you visit our sponsors on the day and check out their websites!

 

PLATINUM

MIMOTOPES

 

GOLD

LABTEK

LAB CABS

LONZA

EPPENDORF

MILTENYI BIOTEC

SARSTEDT

SILVER

PROMEGA

SCIENTIFIX

CORNING

BIOTOOLS

AUSTRALIAN GENOME RESEARCH FACILITY

BIOLINE

ANDI-CO/LIEBHERR

TRENDBIO

BRONZE

BANKSIA SCIENTIFIC

GENESEARCH