Prof Ian Hector Frazer

AC, FRS, FAA, MB ChB(Edin), MD(Melb)

TRI Ambassador and Chair of TRI Foundation Board

About me

 

Professor Ian Frazer works to raise awareness and funds for medical research through his role with The University of Queensland (UQ) and as Chair of the TRI Foundation Board.  He is also a member of the Commonwealth Science Council and President of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Science.

At UQ, Professor Frazer works with the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research) as an advisor on medical research.  He also leads a research program at TRI on skin cancer immunology with staff from UQ’s Diamantina Institute and continues to work with Amedus Vaccines on a herpes vaccine and new vaccine technologies.

As the founding Chief Executive Officer and Director of Research for the Translational Research Institute (TRI) in Brisbane, Australia, Professor Frazer lead the development of a world-leading biomedical research facility focused on translating scientific knowledge into practical benefits for the community.  Combining the intellect of its partners: the University of Queensland’s Diamantina Institute, Mater Research and School of Medicine; Queensland University of Technology Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation; and the Princess Alexandra Hospital Centres for Research, with a Clinical Research Facility and a co-located biopharmaceutical manufacturer, TRI has the capacity to discover, produce, test and manufacture new treatments and vaccines in one location.     

Internationally renowned for the co-creation of the technology for the cervical cancer vaccines, Professor Frazer began his career as a renal physician and clinical immunologist in Edinburgh, Scotland before immigrating in 1981 to Melbourne, Australia. He continued his clinical training and pursued studies in viral immunology and autoimmunity at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research with Professor Ian Mackay. In 1985, Professor Frazer accepted a teaching post with The University of Queensland and was appointed Director of The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute in 1991. In early 2011, Professor Frazer relinquished directorship of the Institute to commence as CEO and Director of Research for TRI. In February 2015, he relinquished this role to focus more on his research.

Professor Frazer was awarded the 2005 CSIRO Eureka Prize for Leadership in Science and was selected as Queenslander of the Year, and Australian of the Year in 2006. He was also awarded the 2008 Prime Minister's Prize for Science, the 2008 Balzan Prize for Preventive Medicine, the 2009 Honda Prize and was recently elected as a Fellow of the esteemed Royal Society of London. In 2012, Professor Frazer was appointed a Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) in the Queen’s Birthday Honours.

Projects

Currently involved in the following TRI based research projects:

Gardasil HPV Cervical Cancer Vaccine

Vaccine for Herpes Simplex Virus

Interventions to cure skin cancer with immunotherapy

Publications

 IL-18, but not IL-12, induces production of IFN-gamma in the immunosuppressive environment of HPV16 E7 transgenic hyperplastic skinGosmann, Christina, Frazer, Ian H., Mattarollo, Stephen R. and Blumenthal, Antje (2014) IL-18, but not IL-12, induces production of IFN-gamma in the immunosuppressive environment of HPV16 E7 transgenic hyperplastic skin. Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Advance online publication : 1-8.

The kinematics of cytotoxic lymphocytes influence their ability to kill target cellsBhat, Purnima, Leggatt, Graham, Matthaei, Klaus I. and Frazer, Ian H. (2014) The kinematics of cytotoxic lymphocytes influence their ability to kill target cells. PLoS One, 9 5: e95248.1-e95248.11.

The early monocytic response to cytomegalovirus infection is MyD88 dependent but occurs independently of common inflammatory cytokine signalsWikstrom, Matthew E., Khong, Andrea, Fleming, Peter, Kuns, Rachel, Hertzog, Paul J., Frazer, Ian H., Andoniou, Christopher E., Hill, Geoffrey R. and Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A. (2014) The early monocytic response to cytomegalovirus infection is MyD88 dependent but occurs independently of common inflammatory cytokine signals. European Journal of Immunology, 44 2: 409-419.

 

Research fields

Skin Cancer; Immunotherapy