Zoom seminar
15 Jul 2020 9:30am to 10:30am
22 Jul 2020 9:30am to 10:30am
29 Jul 2020 9:30am to 10:30am
05 Aug 2020 9:30am to 10:30am

UQDI Webinar Seminar Series

This is a weekly series open to all occupants to attend. This will be a Zoom webinar and is password protected. To register for this seminar, please email: [email protected]

Date Presenter Seminar Title Speaker Bio Location and Time
Wednesday 22 July A/Prof Rick Strum and Dr Mitchell Stark

'4-decade odyssey in scientific research: from genes to dermatology' presented by A/Prof Rick Sturm

'Mutational signatures in benign neoplasms of the skin' presented by Dr Mitchell Stark 

Rick Sturm’s Bio: A/Prof Sturm trained as a molecular biologist and has been an active research scientist for 40 years. His research focus is the biology of the melanocyte cell and pigmentation genetics in relation to human skin cancer, skin UV-sensitivity, freckling, iris colour and naevi (mole) formation.  Landmark publications from his laboratory have described the genetic association between human MC1R gene variant alleles (the gene for red hair), skin type, tanning and UV repair, and the cellular and biochemical properties of the variant forms of the MC1R receptor.  More recently he has examined the genes underlying the type and number of naevi, and the interaction of MC1R genotype and total body naevi in the risk of melanoma in the Queensland population.

Mitchell Stark’s Bio: Dr Stark is currently a University of Queensland (UQ) Amplify Research Fellow based in the Dermatology Research Centre, at The UQ Diamantina Institute. He was awarded his PhD in 2015 and has been actively working in the field of melanoma and naevi genomics and biomarker development for 20+ years. His teams primary research focus is identifying early signs of melanoma progression via ‘melanoma-specific’ microRNAs as well as genomic profiling of precursor skin lesions that may be useful for clinical management of disease. He is the author of 68 scientific publications and one patent (h-index, 34).
 

9:30am-10:30am

Zoom meeting only. Contact [email protected] for seminar link 

Wednesday 15 July Prof H. Peter Soyer and Brigid Betz-Stablein Australian Centre of Excellence for Melanoma Imaging and Diagnosis (ACEMID) and first results of the “Mind Your Moles” Study

Prof H. Peter Soyer has a dual academic/clinical role as the inaugural Chair and Director Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, and as Director Princess Alexandra Hospital Dermatology Department. Professor Soyer, an academic dermatologist from Austria, is a world leader in the field of dermatology with particular expertise in dermato oncology and dermatologic imaging. His research group’s main focus is skin cancer, both melanoma and keratinocyte skin cancer. He has an extensive publication record with over 500 publications (>135 publications in the last 5 years), over 700 citations a year and a Hirsch index of 52 (Researcher ID). He initiated establishment and is Co-leader of the Australian Skin and Skin Cancer (ASSC) Research Centre.

Brigid Betz-Stablein is an early career research fellow with the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence for the study of Naevi. She has dual appointments with the Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute. Dr Betz-Stablein is biostatistician with a strength for working with interdisciplinary groups. Currently her research involves the application of statistical and machine learning methods to dermatology images with the goal of improving the early detection of skin cancer. She has received competitive grant funding, has multiple international collaborations and an accelerating publication record. Additionally, Dr Betz-Stablein is recognized as an AStat Accredited Statistician with the Statistical Society of Australia.

9:30am-10:30am

Zoom meeting only. Contact [email protected] for seminar link 

Wednesday 8 July Dr Abate Bashaw and Joachim Torrano

"HPV16 E7-induced epithelial hyperplasia impairs cell-mediated immune responses through regulatory T cells" presented by Dr Abate Bashaw 

"The role of SETDB1/2-mediated H3K9me3 in drug-tolerant cancer" presented by Joachim Torrano

Dr Bashaw recently completed his PhD at the University of Queensland Diamantina Insitute. Currently, he is working as a postdoctoral research fellow in the School of Biomedical Science at the University of Queensland. 

Joachim Torrano is a trained molecular biologist, with expertise in chromatin immunoprecipitation and a background in melanoma research. Joachim completed a BBiomedSc majoring in the Molecular Basis of Health and Disease at the University of Otago in 2015. He was immediately successful in attaining a UQ summer scholarship, taking up a position in Associate Professor Helmut Schaider's lab at the University of Queensland's Diamantina Institute. In 2020 he completed an MPhil (Research) with UQDI and currently continues his work as a Research Assistant helping with various groups at the UQDI's Dermatology Research Centre. 

9:30am-10:30am

Zoom meeting only. Contact [email protected] for seminar link 

Wednesday 1 July Erin McMeniman and Christine Lee

Structural and functional characterisation of the thrombopoietin receptor and its negative regulator, LNK in myeloid malignancies presented by Christine Lee

Interplay of genetics and environment in Melanoma presented by Erin McMeniman

Dr McMeniman is a Dermatologist with an interest in clinical research, public health and teaching. She has a Master of Public Health with a dissertation project in skin diseases in indigenous children. She completed GP training and subsequently the Dermatology specialty training program.  Dr McMeniman has submitted her final PhD thesis after examiner corrections in February 2020, she studied the phenotypic and genotypic correlations in a cohort of patients with multiple primary melanoma in order to better understand what places patients at risk and to inform targeted screening to improve early detection of melanoma. 

Dr Christine was a PhD student in the Cytokine Receptor Signalling Group at the University of Queensland Diamantina Institute. Christine completed her BSc (Hons) Molecular Biology and Genetics in 2012 (England) and her Masters by Research in 2014 at the Northern Institute for Cancer Research (NICR), Newcastle University (England). Her research was focussing on understanding the basis of accumulation of mutation that drive acute myeloid leukaemia progression, particularly the mutator phenotype. Christine’s current research focus is on the molecular mechanism of JAK-STAT pathway regulation by the thrombopoietin receptor (TPOR) and its negative regulator, LNK. 

9:30am-10:30am

Zoom meeting only. Contact [email protected] for seminar link 

Wednesday 24 June Dr Janin Chandra and Chanhao Zhou Immune modulation and immunotherapy in HPC-induced malignancies 

Professor Dr. Janin Chandra joined Prof. Ian Frazer’s lab at UQDI in 2012 for postdoctoral research training. She then took on a role as Senior Scientist in the immunotherapy-developing company Admedus Vaccines Pty Ltd located at TRI, where she contributed to the translation of a therapeutic DNA vaccine for genital herpes and HPV+ cancers. Janin returned to UQDI in 2019 as research fellow, where she continues to study immunemodulation induced by HPV and identification of immunotherapy targets.

Chenhao Zhou joined the Frazer Lab – Epithelial Cancer Group in 2017 as a PhD student. His research project focuses on understanding the nature of the adaptive immune response to HPV, by studying a transgenic mouse model expressing HPV16 E7 oncoprotein on the surface of epithelial cells. In particular, he uses single-cell RNA sequencing technology to unravel the heterogeneity of CD4+ T helper and regulatory T cell responses. 

9:30am-10:30am

Zoom meeting only. Contact [email protected] for seminar link 

Wednesday 17 June  Dr Shannon Joseph and Priscila Oliveira de Lima Endocytosis inhibition in humans to improve responses to ADCC-Mediating antibodies

Shannon completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Queensland with her PhD completed in the laboratory of Prof Jennifer Stow at the IMB (UQ) focussing on the regulation of the intracellular trafficking of the cellular adhesion molecule E-cadherin. She returned to Ass Prof. Fiona Simpson’s laboratory as a Post-doc in 2011 where her work has focussed on the analysing the trafficking of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) family and monoclonal antibody therapy responses. Dr Joseph was awarded the PARF Innovation Award (2018-2020) to co-lead the laboratories work in improving monoclonal antibody therapies for breast cancer.

Priscila is currently undertaking her Ph.D. in A/Prof. Fiona Simpson’s lab at UQDI based at TRI. She has completed an investigator initiated contract with Merck KgaA testing the lab’s combination therapy in pre-clinical models of colorectal and renal carcinomas. Priscila has also established at TRI, in collaboration with Prof. Glen Boyle and Prof. Ben Panizza, the world's first preclinical mouse model of cutaneous SCC of the head and neck with perineural invasion. The aim of her current project is to humanise the NSG mouse model to allow preclinical testing of monoclonal antibody therapies for perineural invasion.

9:30am-10:30am

Zoom meeting only. Contact [email protected] for seminar link 

Wednesday 10 June  Associate Professor Melissa Davis, WEHI Computational cancer biology and heterogeneity in breast cancer: Moleculat phenotypes and phenotypic plasticity

Associate Professor Melissa Davis is a computational biologist, with a background in genetics and computational cell biology and expertise in the analysis of genome-scale regulatory networks and knowledge-based modelling.

In 2014 she was awarded a four year National Breast Cancer Foundation Career Development Fellowship, taking up a position as Senior Research Fellow in Cancer Systems Biology at the University of Melbourne. In 2016 Melissa relocated her group to the Bioinformatics Division of the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute for Medical Research, and in 2019 she was appointed as Associate Professor, and Joint Head of the Bioinformatics Division.          

9:30am-10:30am

Zoom meeting only. Contact [email protected] for seminar link 

Wednesday 3 June Professor Dave Evans and Dr Daniel Hwang

Journeys in Genetic Epidemiology presented by Prof Dave Evans 

A new method to impute parental genotypes using genetic information from their offspring presented by Dr Daniel Hwang

David Evans is Professor of Statistical Genetics at the University of Queensland Diamantina Institute. He completed his PhD in Statistical Genetics at the University of Queensland in 2003, before undertaking a four year post-doctoral fellowship at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford. In 2013 he returned to take up his current position at the University of Queensland whilst continuing to lead an MRC Programme in genetic epidemiology at the University of Bristol. His research interests include the genetic mapping of complex traits and diseases and the development of statistical methodologies in genetic epidemiology including approaches for gene mapping, individual risk prediction, causal modelling and dissecting the genetic architecture of complex traits.

In 2018 Daniel Hwang completed a PhD at the University of Queensland and joined the University of Queensland Diamantina Institute as a postdoctoral research fellow. His research has contributed to fundamental scientific advances in understanding how genes influence taste perception, dietary behaviour and related health risks, which have  since been published in top-tier journals, including the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and the International Journal of Epidemiology. Daniel’s current research focuses on the development and application of statistical genetics methodologies to assess health impacts of diet and nutrition. Recently, he is involved in a global initiative to study the relationship between the loss of smell and taste and COVID-19.

9:30am-10:30am

Zoom meeting only. Contact [email protected] for seminar link 

Wednesday 27 May  Professor Matt Sweet, IMB A wander through the wonders of innate immunity: in search of mechanisms controlling inflammation and host defence Prof Matt Sweet completed his PhD under the supervision of David Hume in 1996 at The University of Queensland, Australia. He then undertook an NHMRC CJ Martin post-doctoral training fellowship at the University of Glasgow (Scotland, UK) in the laboratory of Eddy Liew. After returning to Australia, he had a number of key roles within the Cooperative Research Centre for Chronic Inflammatory Diseases at The University of Queensland and was appointed to the position of Group Leader at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) in 2007. His laboratory at the IMB focuses on the roles of pattern recognition receptors, their signalling components and their downstream target genes in regulating both infectious and inflammatory disease processes.

9:30am-10:30am

Zoom meeting only. Contact [email protected] for seminar link 

Wednesday 20 May Dr Aideen McInerney-Leo Dr Tatiane Yanes

Mainstream Genetic Testing and Tatiane will present Clinical implementation of polygenic testing.

Dr McInerney-Leo is a clinician-academic whose interactions with patients have shaped her research questions and fuelled her enthusiasm for the importance of clinical research. Trained as a genetic counsellor, research now focuses on the integration of genomics into clinical care. Her research program has had three primary themes: evaluating the psychosocial impact of genetic conditions and/or genetic testing; evaluating genetics education preferences for patients and healthcare providers; and using next-generation sequencing to increase diagnostic yield for rare disorders.

9:30am-10:30am

Zoom meeting only. Contact [email protected] for seminar link 

Cancelled
18 March

Professor Matt Sweet, IMB A wander through the wonders of innate immunity: in search of mechanisms controlling inflammation and host defence

  Prof Matt Sweet completed his PhD under the supervision of David Hume in 1996 at The University of Queensland, Australia. He then undertook an NHMRC CJ Martin post-doctoral training fellowship at the University of Glasgow (Scotland, UK) in the laboratory of Eddy Liew. After returning to Australia, he had a number of key roles within the Cooperative Research Centre for Chronic Inflammatory Diseases at The University of Queensland and was appointed to the position of Group Leader at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) in 2007. His laboratory at the IMB focuses on the roles of pattern recognition receptors, their signalling components and their downstream target genes in regulating both infectious and inflammatory disease processes.

9:30am - 10:30am

Auditorium 

11th March Dr Loredana Spoerri and Phd Student Robert Ju Melanoma phenotypic heterogeneity is regulated by MITF-mediated cell matrix interaction presented by Dr Loredana Spoerri and Uncovering Microtubule-driven Mechanisms of Melanoma Invasion presented by Robert Ju. 

Loredana currently works with Professor Haass to understand the fundamental mechanisms governing melanoma dynamic heterogeneity whereby she applies spatio-temporal confocal imaging in in vitro 3D melanoma models. Her work aims to identify novel avenues to predict and improve melanoma therapy outcomes.

Robert is a joint PhD student in the Stehbens (IMB) and Haass Lab (UQDI) attempting to understand cytoskeletal driven mechanisms of melanoma invasion using novel tools and imaging approaches.

9:30am - 10:30am

Seminar room 2003 

4th March Professor Di Yu Coordinating the fight against pathogens: fundamental immunology and potential translation

Dr. Di Yu was awarded his PhD from the Australian National University (ANU) in 2007. After working in the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Monash University and ANU, he was recruited to the University of Queensland Diamantina Institute in late 2019 and appointed as a Professorial Research Fellow.

He has frequently been published in top-tier journals including Nature, Nature Immunology, Nature Medicine and Immunity. He is a Highly Cited Researcher (2019).

9:30am - 10:30am

Seminar room 2003 

26th February  Katherine Robbins (Medical Student) Contribution of the Notch4-Wnt5a axis to melanoma plasticity and drug resistance

Katie is investigating the crosstalk and regulation between Notch4 and Wnt5a in melanoma phenotype switching in metastasis.

This work has a strong translational component to elucidate the interplay of two important evolutionary conserved pathways for melanoma progression, metastases and drug resistance.

9:30am-10:30am

Seminar Room 2004 

19th February  PhD Students Carrie Coggon and Amy Pham 

Antibody that exacerbates disease in sepsis and lung infection

Carrie Coggon - A novel method of serum resistance in Escherichia coli mediated sepsis

Amy Pham - Outfoxing Pseudomonas and Burkholderia in chronic lung infections

Carrie is a final year PhD student in the T-Wells group. Her research focuses on determining the mechanisms underlying antibodies that inhibit complement-mediated killing of E. coli.  

Amy is a second year PhD student in the T-Wells group. Her research focuses on the bacterial-host interactions in patients with chronic lung disease pre and post lung transplant. Her work has already led directly to treatment of two patients.

9:30am-10:30am

Seminar Room 2003 

12th February  Professor Nick Hayward The genomic landscape of acral  melanoma

Professor Nick Hayward has studied the molecular genetics of melanoma for over 30 years. He was the first to carry out a linkage scan for melanoma susceptibility genes, to confirm the location of one such gene (CDKN2A), and to report mutations of CDKN2A in Australian families. He played key roles in the identification of CDK4, POT1, ACD, TERF2IP and MITF as melanoma susceptibility genes and in linkage and association scans for melanoma, pigmentation and nevi.

9:30am-10:30am

Seminar Room 2003