Auditorium
08 Apr 2020 9:30am to 10:30am

Cancelled: UQDI Seminar Series

The UQDI Seminar Series is currently cancelled until further notice. 

This is a weekly series open to all occupants to attend. The next seminar will take place on the 19 February. 

Date Presenter Seminar Title Speaker Bio Location and Time

Cancelled
18 March

Professor Matt Sweet, IMB A wander through the wonders of innate immunity: in search of mechanisms controlling inflammation and host defence

  Prof Matt Sweet completed his PhD under the supervision of David Hume in 1996 at The University of Queensland, Australia. He then undertook an NHMRC CJ Martin post-doctoral training fellowship at the University of Glasgow (Scotland, UK) in the laboratory of Eddy Liew. After returning to Australia, he had a number of key roles within the Cooperative Research Centre for Chronic Inflammatory Diseases at The University of Queensland and was appointed to the position of Group Leader at the Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) in 2007. His laboratory at the IMB focuses on the roles of pattern recognition receptors, their signalling components and their downstream target genes in regulating both infectious and inflammatory disease processes.

9:30am - 10:30am

Auditorium 

11th March Dr Loredana Spoerri and Phd Student Robert Ju Melanoma phenotypic heterogeneity is regulated by MITF-mediated cell matrix interaction presented by Dr Loredana Spoerri and Uncovering Microtubule-driven Mechanisms of Melanoma Invasion presented by Robert Ju. 

Loredana currently works with Professor Haass to understand the fundamental mechanisms governing melanoma dynamic heterogeneity whereby she applies spatio-temporal confocal imaging in in vitro 3D melanoma models. Her work aims to identify novel avenues to predict and improve melanoma therapy outcomes.

Robert is a joint PhD student in the Stehbens (IMB) and Haass Lab (UQDI) attempting to understand cytoskeletal driven mechanisms of melanoma invasion using novel tools and imaging approaches.

9:30am - 10:30am

Seminar room 2003 

4th March Professor Di Yu Coordinating the fight against pathogens: fundamental immunology and potential translation

Dr. Di Yu was awarded his PhD from the Australian National University (ANU) in 2007. After working in the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Monash University and ANU, he was recruited to the University of Queensland Diamantina Institute in late 2019 and appointed as a Professorial Research Fellow.

He has frequently been published in top-tier journals including Nature, Nature Immunology, Nature Medicine and Immunity. He is a Highly Cited Researcher (2019).

9:30am - 10:30am

Seminar room 2003 

26th February  Katherine Robbins (Medical Student) Contribution of the Notch4-Wnt5a axis to melanoma plasticity and drug resistance

Katie is investigating the crosstalk and regulation between Notch4 and Wnt5a in melanoma phenotype switching in metastasis.

This work has a strong translational component to elucidate the interplay of two important evolutionary conserved pathways for melanoma progression, metastases and drug resistance.

9:30am-10:30am

Seminar Room 2004 

19th February  PhD Students Carrie Coggon and Amy Pham 

Antibody that exacerbates disease in sepsis and lung infection

Carrie Coggon - A novel method of serum resistance in Escherichia coli mediated sepsis

Amy Pham - Outfoxing Pseudomonas and Burkholderia in chronic lung infections

Carrie is a final year PhD student in the T-Wells group. Her research focuses on determining the mechanisms underlying antibodies that inhibit complement-mediated killing of E. coli.  

Amy is a second year PhD student in the T-Wells group. Her research focuses on the bacterial-host interactions in patients with chronic lung disease pre and post lung transplant. Her work has already led directly to treatment of two patients.

9:30am-10:30am

Seminar Room 2003 

12th February  Professor Nick Hayward The genomic landscape of acral  melanoma

Professor Nick Hayward has studied the molecular genetics of melanoma for over 30 years. He was the first to carry out a linkage scan for melanoma susceptibility genes, to confirm the location of one such gene (CDKN2A), and to report mutations of CDKN2A in Australian families. He played key roles in the identification of CDK4, POT1, ACD, TERF2IP and MITF as melanoma susceptibility genes and in linkage and association scans for melanoma, pigmentation and nevi.

9:30am-10:30am

Seminar Room 2003